#SaintAwesome Ambassador

This past week, I was invited to a very cool event put on by the good people at Discover Saint John.  The event was a delicious ice cream social, put on as a way to thank a few social media influencers who have really embraced the SaintAwesome hashtag and helped to promote the area on their social media accounts.

I was honoured to be one of the chosen guests.

The event was held at the beautiful and historic One Princess location: part Strong and Free shop and part Airbnb.  The Airbnb suites are beautiful done and have incredible views of the Saint John Harbour and cityscape.

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Views from the balcony at One Princess
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Views from the balcony at One Princess

It was wonderful to meet the team at Discover Saint John.  I so admire the work they do to bring our sweet little gem of a city to the world.  They are all lovely people who are as passionate about this city as I am.  I love that.

It was also great to meet other people in the community, some I’ve followed on social media for awhile.  It’s a reminder that when social media is used correctly, it can bring communities together toward a common goal.

The party was perfect, with a huge spread of sundae toppings and the cutest cookies I’ve ever seen made by The Cooling Rack Cookie Co.  We were gifted with our very own #SaintAwesome Ambassador t-shirts to proudly wear around town and were given a hint at some of the exciting events happening in the city this summer (it’s going to be amazing!).

Sal-Mon the #SaintAwesome Salmon
Adorable cookies from The Cooling Rack Cookie Co.

I want to thank Discover Saint John to inviting me to be a #SaintAwesome Ambassador, it’s a label I will wear with pride.  I believe that we have something truly special here in Saint John, and we should take every opportunity to share it with the world.


And, when our city does well, we all do well.

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Photo Exploration of North End Saint John

I know, I’ve been a bit MIA lately.  Sometimes, you just need a little break, ya know?

It’s not that we haven’t been on some amazing adventures.  And if you follow me on Instagram (link in sidebar), than you know that we’ve been to Parlee Brook Amphitheatre and Fundy National Park this winter, both amazing experiences.  But it’s spring now, and with it comes some nicer temperatures for getting outside and exploring with a camera.

If you are not familiar with the IGers brand of Instagram accounts, it’s a worldwide network designed to bring amateur photographers together.  They organize regular InstaMeets, where you can get together with other members of your community, take some photos and hopefully make a few friends along the way.  We’re very lucky to have our own IGers account here in the city of Saint John, as they are not often given out to cities with a population of less than 100, 000.  But co-moderator Monique Gionet wrote to Instagramers.com with an essay on why we deserve our own account.  I don’t know what she said in that essay, but she won them over.

Yesterday, as part of Worldwide Instagram Meet #15, me and a few other Saint John IGers (@igerssaintjohn) took to the streets of old north end Saint John to spread some love and make some art.

It was such a fun experience.  Talking to people I’ve only known online and who are as passionate about photography and this city as I am was wonderful.  And there was so much to explore in the north end.  Places I didn’t even know existed, like Victoria Square and Nicolle Community Centre.  And the people we met on the streets were so friendly!  From people shouting hello to us from second story windows, to people on the streets who stopped to chat, there is a real sense of community here.  And I think people were happy to see that their often forgotten neighbourhood was getting a little bit of attention.

This neighbourhood has many challenges, that’s for certain.  There were so many more boarded up buildings than I imagined there would be.  But there’s so much potential here, if people would just take a closer look.

Here’s my photo exploration of Saint John North, as part of #wwim15:

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I want to thank Monique and Bryn for organizing such a wonderful event.  I can’t wait for the next meet!

If you’d like to see more photos from our meet and you’re on Instagram, search for the hashtag #wwim15sj.

Surprising Finds in the Maritimes: New Maryland, site of the last fatal duel in NB

On a recent trip to Mount Carleton, my husband and I drove past a highway sign for New Maryland, New Brunswick.  The sign proudly states that New Maryland is the site of the last fatal duel in the province.  Being the curious person that I am, I couldn’t pass that up, so off we pulled into the village.

Unfortunately, once in New Maryland, I couldn’t find any monument or site dedicated to the duel.  Perhaps I missed something?  I scoured the internet for information on where I could go to commemorate this strange historical event.  I couldn’t find anything about a landmark in town but I did find the story of the duel online, on the New Maryland village website.

The story itself is fascinating, and really quite shocking. Of course, I realize that duels were once the way conflicts were dealt with and that they no doubt occurred here, but to be faced with such detailed facts of the story, made it seem much more real.

For those who are interested, I encourage you to go to the Village of New Maryland website and read the full account, as written by Connie Shanks, published in the Atlantic Advocate in 1991.

Here’s my ‘Coles Notes’ version:

It was really all a case of mistaken identity.  In 1821 in New Maryland, an attorney name George Frederick Street, mistakenly told the sheriff to arrest Jacob Smith Sr. instead of his son, Jacob Smith Jr.

Papa Smitty wasn’t on very good terms with Junior, and wasn’t too impressed with being dragged in on false charges, rightly so.  He got himself a lawyer, a fellow by the name of George Ludlow Wetmore.

Some lawyer-ey stuff went down in court and the two George’s (Street and Wetmore) went at it in a heated argument that included insults and possibly physical violence, outside the courtroom.  

Now, young Wetmore just couldn’t seem to let the whole thing go and had his good buddy John Winslow go to Street’s house the next morning and challenge him to a duel.  It was all terribly formal.  Street agreed and the plan was set.

Wetmore’s buddy Winslow tried to talk the two of them out of it, as any good buddy should, but pride being what it was between men in the 1800’s (or anytime, for that matter), both vehemently refused to offer an apology or take any blame in the matter.

The duel took place in the early morning of October 2nd, 1821, on Maryland Hill, four miles from Fredericton.  As dueling was at this point technically illegal, the families of both men had no idea what was about to go down.

 The two men faced each across the field, aimed and fired their pistols.  Both missed with their first shot.  Now, at this point, you’d think they’d quit while they were both ahead (and alive),  but damn it if Wetmore didn’t insist they tempt fate one more time!  

Murphy’s Law being what it is, Wetmore of course took the brunt of the damage in the second shot and quickly went down.  He was hit in the arm and the head with the same bullet.

Winslow ran to the farmhouse to get some help for his friend.  Street took off as soon he heard help coming and headed for the safety of Robbinstown, Maine.

Wetmore died from his wounds and Street surrendered in December that same year. There was a trial, but in the end no real charges were laid, presumably because both men were dumb enough to enter into a duel.  Street even went on to practice law again and become a judge of the Supreme Court.   He continued to insist that his actions on that fateful morning were justified.

The family of the fallen Wetmore carried on, one son became a judge of the Supreme Court and then later, premier of New Brunswick.

The story goes that the Streets and Wetmores never spoke again, becoming what I can only envision as the Capulets and Montagues of New Brunswick.

If anyone knows if there is actually a monument of some kind to the duel in New Maryland, please let me know.

If not, I would encourage the people of New Maryland to capitalize on this unique history! Your highway sign brings people in, but there should be some place they can go to learn more about the duel.

If you know of something that’s a Surprising Find in the Maritimes, I’d love to hear about it!

 

 

 

A Winter’s Trip to Ministers Island, NB

I don’t know of many islands in the world that you get to by driving over the ocean floor at low tide, but Ministers Island is one of them.  Located in the Bay of Fundy, just off the coast of uber-charming St. Andrews by-the-Sea, a trip to Ministers Island is like stepping back in time.  The island is home to the property of Sir William Van Horne, famous for his role in building the Canadian Pacific Railway.  Van Horne bought part of the island (named Ministers Island because one of the first settlers was Reverand Samuel Andrews) in 1890.  On the property he built a magnificent 50-room summer home named Covenhoven and several other outbuildings, including a windmill, ice house and creamery and a stunning bathhouse built against the cliff-side that offers panoramic views of the Bay of Fundy.

I was really enchanted by our short visit a few weeks ago.  Even though the buildings are closed up for the winter months, you still get a real sense of history as you stroll through the grounds and their beautifully built structures.  You could spend hours here exploring the island and it’s many trails.  Just make sure you make it back over the bar before the tide comes up!

The barn recently sustained significant damage to its silos and requires extensive repairs. For information about how you can help with the restoration efforts, follow their Facebook page Ministers Island or visit their website here.

Here are some pictures I took from our trip to the island.  I would highly recommend planning a trip of your own.  It would be really lovely in the summer!

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Waiting for the tide to reveal our road to Ministers Island.  You can see the barn poking through the trees on the far right.
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Heading across the bar to the island
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The first structure you come to on the island is the house of Reverend Samuel Andrews, built in 1790 and the reason for the island’s name.
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The barn and creamery.  The damage to the silos is clearly visible.
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One of the trails on the island, that leads through a hedge of eastern white cedar and feels like walking through a Robert Frost poem.
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The windmill and back of the main house, Covenhoven.
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The pretty front door of Covenhoven.  The house was intended to serve as a summer cottage when construction began in 1891 but underwent many renovations and now stands at 50 rooms.
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Front view of Covenhoven.
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Beauty view from the front porch of the main house.
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Stunning bathhouse, completed in 1912, that inspired many of Van Horne’s paintings.
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Garage built in 1917 for Van Horne’s Model T Ford and other vehicles.  Upstairs is the chauffeur’s apartment.