A Few of My Favourite Maritime Instagramers: 2017 Edition

It’s been about a year since my last A Few of My Favourite Maritime Instagramers post, where I presented some of my favourite IGers and the beautiful work they’re doing to highlight our spectacular corner of the world.

Some people say that Instagram is the last vestige of niceness left on the internet.  And while I think social networks are what you make them, I can’t disagree that Instagram is one of the friendliest and most positive apps.  It’s a place where you scroll through beautiful image after beautiful image and people seem to support each other, instead of trying to break them down.  But don’t let the light attitude fool you, some of these folks work incredibly hard, and produce awe-inspiring images to prove it.

In the past year I’ve increased my follow list substantially and I’ve got some new favourites to share with y’all.

Here’s a few of my favourites from this past year:


Al Douglas (@alexdouglas) – Al is the dude to follow if you want to know what’s new and hot in the food and beverage scene on Prince Edward Island.  And then there’s his incredible landscape photos of the island; so pretty you’ll want to get in your car and head for the Confederation Bridge right now.  You’re welcome.

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Strong winds and a sky on fire.

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Dave Culligan (@dave.culligan) – If you haven’t heard of Dave Culligan and his 365 video project, where you been, yo?  Dave is more than 200 days into his 365 project, and I promise you that watching his daily one minute videos will never fail to improve your mood.  His joie de vivre is infectious and will help you to appreciate all that life has to offer, even when a little rain must fall.

Hilary Hendsbee (@hilaryhendsbee) – Hilary is my kind of gal.  An explorer and adventurer, avid camper and hiker, Hilary and her trusty Tiguan go all the places you always wanted to go but never seem to have the time (and a few you’ve never heard of!). Her photographic style is stunning and reveals the wildness right in our own backyards.

Brinton Photography (@brintonphotography) – Using a commercial drone, photographer Gary Brinton captures some of the most stunning landscape photography I have ever seen. His work puts a whole new perspective on the beauty of this region, that we so often take for granted.

Gillian Barfoot (@eyegillian) – Gillian is a New Brunswick based photographer with a special knack for turning ordinary objects into fascinating subjects.  She’s been on fire with her photography so far this year and I can’t wait to see what she’s got in store next. But no pressure!

Chillin With Bernie (@chillinwithbernie) – There are a number of young Halifax photographers currently taking Instagram by storm, but perhaps none more so than Bernie, aka Chillin With Bernie.  His photos have an edgy, stylistic vibe and deftly display the intimate relationship between subject and environment.

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😍😍😍

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Jon Billings (@jonbillings) – Jon is a photographer based on the island of Grand Manan, where the highest tides in the world relentlessly batter this small spit of land whilst creating some of the most majestic landscapes you’ll ever see.  But don’t just take my word for it, go check out Jon’s feed.

Explore the East (@exploreeast) – Explore the East has been featured on the blog before, but their work is so good, I had to include them here.  The Instagram account was started by Nicole Boutilier and Colby Veinotte as a way to share their adventures and highlight lesser known areas of the region.  They not only feature their photos, but those of other Instagramers as well.  It’s a wonderfully collaborative page, focused on highlighting the best of the East Coast.

Do you know of a great Maritime Instagramer doing great work?  Let me know in the comments section!

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2016: Year in Review

Christmas is right around the corner and I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all of my readers for following along on my Maritime adventures this past year.  I hope you all enjoy some time with loved ones over the holidays!

Now is the time to reflect on the passing year and to look forward to what’s next.  Joel and I went on some great adventures in 2016.

There was cliffside camping on Turtle Mountain.  That was an incredible experience. Long hike.  We almost got eaten by bears.  Totally worth it.

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Cliffside camping on Turtle Mountain
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NB, you are stunning
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Panoramic views

We also camped overnight at Cape Split, on the Nova Scotia side of the Bay of Fundy.  We shared the trail with a lot more hikers than we’re used to but when you arrive on the edge of that cliff overlooking the Minas Basin, it’s easy to see the appeal.  It was definitely one of the highlights of our year.

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Those views, though.
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More cliffside camping

We combined our Cape Split adventure with a road trip around the western half of Nova Scotia, with stops in Yarmouth, Cape Sable Island (the most southerly point of NS), historic Lunenburg, stunning Blue Rocks and Halifax.  Although we squeezed as much as we could into the trip, there are so many more places I wished we could have stopped. Next time, I guess.

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Walking The Hawk Beach
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Lunenburg waterfront
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Gloomy Maritime charm in Blue Rocks, NS

Also in 2016, we finally made it up to Mount Carleton Provincial Park, where we got to hike and stand on top of the highest peak in the Maritimes.  They say you can see 10 million trees from the peak, and I’d say that is probably true.

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Heading for the peak
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On top of Mount Carleton

We even managed to make a trip to Prince Edward Island, to beautiful Dalvay by the Sea. Such a lovely place.

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Dalvay by the Sea
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Dalvay Beach

Closer to home, we explored the new addition to the Fundy Trail Parkway in the spring, toured Ministers Island in the winter, Kingsbrae Gardens in the summer, and checked out Walton Glen Gorge in the fall, among so many others.  This truly is the province of all season adventure.

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Gorgeous displays at Kingsbrae Gardens
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Ministers Island
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Long Beach, now accessible by Fundy Trail
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Walton Glen Gorge in Fall

As for what 2017 holds in store, I’ve already declared it to be The Year of the Park.

With all National Parks, Historic Sites and Marine Conservation Areas offering free admission in 2017 to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday, this will be the perfect year to take advantage of the best this country has to offer in the way of outdoor adventure.  We already have plans to camp in Fundy National Park for the first time in winter, as the park is open as part of the birthday celebrations.  I would encourage you all to take advantage of this incredible opportunity to experience the wildness that makes this country so great.

Again, thanks for reading and I’ll see you on the trails in 2017!

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A Decade in Saint John: My Best Of List

Since posting that I’m celebrating my 10 year anniversary of moving to Saint John, its become clear that my schedule is not going allow me to write a separate post for each of my favourite places in Saint John as I’d hoped .  If you follow me on Instagram, I’ve been posting a few photos of my favourite places in Saint John over there (link on sidebar).

Since time is pressing and October is almost done, I decided that a single post with all of my Port City Best Of’s would be more efficient.

So here are my Best Of Saint John:

Best Place to Find Outdoor Adventure

Rockwood Park – with over 55 trails and endless activities to choose from, you can disappear into the wilderness, right inside the city.

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Best Place to Catch Live Music/Eat Your Body Weight in Wings

Peppers Pub – showcasing the best in local and come-from -away talent.  Wing nights are Thursday.  Get there early.

Best Place to Watch a Sunset

Brothers Cove/RKYC – any night of the week in the summer, you can find people drawn to this beautiful spot to watch the sun disappear over the Kennebecasis River in fantastic fashion.

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Best Views of the City

Fort Howe – panoramic views of the city and harbour.  Also, get a selfie with the famous Saint John sign!

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Best Place to People Watch

King’s Square – pack a lunch and park yourself on one of the benches around the King’s Square Bandstand and watch the people go by.

Best Place to Catch an Amazing Show

Imperial Theatre – a theatre circa 1913, restored in incredible detail.  I don’t know what I love more: The shows or the setting.

Best Place for a Fancy Meal

East Coast Bistro – Chefs Tim Muehlbauer and Kim Steele serve up locally sourced food with a distinctively Maritime twist.  You won’t be disappointed.

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Best Place for Bargain Meal

Thai Pho – owners Julia and Dave Park welcome you to Thai Pho as if it was their home. They take great care to serve delicious Thai and Vietnamese food at a great price.

Best Place to Score Killer Style

Exchange on Germain – selling mid to high-end consignment items, I find something great every time I open the doors.

Best Place for a Cocktail

Port City Royal – house mixologist Eric Scouten was named one of 10 Mixologists Putting Canada on the Map, by destinationcanada.com.

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Best Place to Get a Coffee

Java Moose – I’m going to say specifically in the Saint John City Market, this iconic Saint John coffee company is much loved by locals and visitors alike.

Best Place for a Romantic Getaway

Chipman Hill Suites – with numerous beautiful buildings around historic Uptown Saint John, you can have a romantic getaway right in the heart of the city.

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Best Place for a Walk on the Beach

Bayshore Beach – while most people will tell you that New River Beach is the nicest beach around (and I wouldn’t disagree), Bayshore Beach on the city’s west side allows you to stroll along the famous Bay of Fundy ocean floor in much closer proximity.

A Decade in Saint John: A Month-Long Celebration

A decade ago this October, I packed up a truck-load of all my worldly possessions and drove into Saint John as this city’s newest resident.  I was moving to the Port City to take my first real, grown-up job as a Cytotechnologist at the Saint John Regional Hospital.

Driving into town for the first time, I missed the exit I was supposed to take and ended up driving over the Harbour Bridge.  Classic rookie mistake.  It did, however, give me a chance to see a bit of my new home town.  I remember thinking as I passed through, what is this place?  With the audacity to have its own Hollywood sign and a major highway straight through its centre?

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I think I loved it, right then and there.

It makes sense that I would love it here, really.  Growing up in rural Nova Scotia, I’ve seen so many communities struggle just to stay alive, in much the same way that Saint John has struggled.  Just as people like to root for the underdog, I like to root for the undervalued and unappreciated places in the Maritimes.

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When I first took the job in Saint John, people tried to tell me not to move.  It seemed that Saint John inspired a rather apathetic response in Maritimers, at best.  Why are you moving there? was a common question I received as I prepared to move my entire life there.  That is, except for a couple I met at the restaurant where I worked, who lived in Saint John. They boasted about the beauty of their city and its friendly people.  After chatting with them for a few minutes, I decided that there was hope for my new city, after all.  As it turns out, they were right.

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I haven’t regretted a moment that I’ve spent here.

In many ways, I feel as though I’ve found myself here.  I met the love of my life here and we married three years ago.  We bought a home, set up a busy, satisfying life here.  I have a rewarding career and enough hobbies to keep me busy 24 hours a day.  In the past couple of years I’ve unexpectedly discovered a new purpose: to use my passion and love for the region to spread the word about all the inspiring people and remarkable things that are happening here. Because this place deserves to be seen as more than the Armpit of the Maritimes.  It deserves to be a destination in its own right.

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If you saw the recent CBC documentary about Saint John, City on Fire, then you’ll understand that it’s an exciting time to live in Saint John.  There is a momentum building in the city, and it makes you want to get involved.  To be a part of the movement.  To prove that a community can take control of its own destiny, and decide for themselves who they’re going to be.  We don’t (and shouldn’t) have to wait for government to bail us out.  We can build a better community, all by ourselves, for ourselves.

To celebrate 10 years in the Port City, I’ll be bringing you posts of all my favourite places in the area, all month long.  Those most visited, and those I couldn’t live without.

So, after a decade in Saint John, the only real question left to answer is this: Can I offically call myself a Saint Johner now?

A Trip to Dalvay-by-the-Sea, PEI

I’m not one to really celebrate dates.  My husband and I never celebrated the anniversary of our first date, we don’t really do anything for Valentine’s Day.  We’re low maintenance kind of people.

Our wedding anniversary seems different, though.  I think it’s important to celebrate this commitment and reaffirm it each year.  We normally do this by taking a trip together. Since getting married three years ago, we’ve been to Iceland and the Magdalen Islands for our first and second anniversaries. This year, we decided to stay closer to home but still wanted to commemorate the event. So, we ventured over the Confederation Bridge for a weekend of sun and surf at Dalvay-by-the-Sea in beautiful Prince Edward Island.

Dalvay-by-the-Sea is a National Historic Site situated within one of PEI’s National Parks, with 25 guest rooms at the Inn and eight, three bedroom cottages on the grounds.  The house was built in 1895 as a summer home for Alexander MacDonald, a wealthy businessman with the Standard Oil Company.  It was built in the Queen Anne Revival style, known for it’s whimsical and exuberant features, asymmetrical lines, many gables, bright colours and wraparound verandas.  Local materials were used extensively: Island sandstone boulders cover the entire lower part of the exterior and three massive indoor fireplaces are made from quarried blocks of the same stone.

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Dalvay-by-the-Sea

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Loved curling up by that fireplace!
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Grand staircase
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Library/sitting room

The effect is a truly stunning structure.  Many of the rooms are very small, and there are no televisions, but that just encourages you to spend more time in the common spaces, which are the true charm of the Inn.  Curling up with a drink by one of the three roaring fires quickly became my favourite activity.  Also, don’t miss out on trying a delicious meal in MacMillan Dining Room, courtesy of Chef Chris Colburn.

If you think the Inn looks familiar and you’re an Anne of Green Gables fan, you might remember it as the White Sands Hotel from the Road to Avonlea series and the Anne of Green Gables movies produced in the 1990’s.

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One of the many carriages used by the MacDonald family

Staying at an Inn inside a National Park has some great advantages.  You’re super close to hiking trails, walking distances from beaches and there are even bicycle rentals right on site.  The Inn is also situated on a lake, and canoe and kayaks are available to take out for a spin.

As we were driving into Dalvay Friday night, the sun was setting just behind the sand dunes in the most gorgeous shades of pinks and oranges I’ve ever seen.  Unfortunately, I didn’t get any pictures of it, we were tired and just wanted to get out of the car.  You will have to take my word for it, it was stunning!  We checked in just in time to get settled and have a couple night caps by the fire in the main lobby.

Saturday morning we got up early, had a delicious breakfast at the Inn and headed out to hike Robinson’s Island, in the park.  The trail is an easy 5 km loop taking you through forest and along the shoreline, with a few beach access points along the way.  As we walked through the sun-filtered woods and explored the deserted beaches, I understood how these landscapes could inspire Lucy Maud Montgomery to pen her famous series.

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Pretty light
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Washed ashore
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Footsteps in the sand

The woods call to us with a hundred voices, but the sea has one only — a mighty voice that drowns our souls in its majestic music. The woods are human, but the sea is of the company of the archangels” – L M Montgomery, from Anne’s House of Dreams.

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A camper by the dunes
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Hanging with my homies

After our hike we made our way over to the PEI Preserve Company to buy some of the best preserves you can get anywhere.  Seriously, check out the Peach Salsa and Strawberry & Grand Marnier jam.  So good.

We had a lovely dinner at The Dunes Studio Gallery and Cafe, which is a really unique spot close to Brackley Beach. Not only do they serve great food, but you get to eat it surrounded by an incredibly eclectic collection of locally made arts and crafts.  There are so many interesting things to look at, you might find yourself spending hours strolling through the seemingly never-ending compound and gardens.

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Very unique fish bowls
Wood carvings on the grounds
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The Iron Throne, but with monkeys?

Back to the Inn for one more drink by the fire and a moonlight stroll along the beach pretty much brought us to the end of our Dalvay stay.  It’s a charming place and feels a little like going back in time.  The season is coming to a close for them very soon but if you can, you should definitely check this place out next season when they reopen!

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Goodnight, Dalvay!

A Kaleidoscope of Colours: The Atlantic Balloon Fiesta

The Atlantic Balloon Fiesta takes place is Sussex, New Brunswick, every year around this time.  With dozens of colourful hot air balloons launching twice daily, it’s truly a sight to behold.  I had never been so I thought I’d get up early this morning and check it out. Early is a bit of an understatement, as the morning balloon launch begins at 6:30 am, meaning I had to get up at 5 am to make it there from Saint John on time!

It was so worth getting up early on a Saturday though, and those who gathered to watch got lucky as conditions were nearly perfect.  Often the balloons aren’t able to launch due to strong winds or cloud cover.  Calm, early mornings are often your best bet to see them in the air.

It’s impossible not to smile when you see those beautiful big balloons going up into the air. Silhouetted against the blue sky, in a multitude of patterns and colours, it’s pure magic.  I can’t even imagine how excited the children in attendance must have been.  I know I felt like a kid.

The fiesta runs through Sunday but with the rain scheduled to come in, this evening at 5:30 pm might be your last chance to see them.  Hot air balloon rides are available, at a price of $180/person but I’m guessing most of the seats have already been sold.  There’s also a craft fair, live music, a carnival and several other events happening on site.

Here are a few pics from my fantastic morning at the fiesta:

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Beautiful morning for a hot air balloon launch!
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Filling up
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Getting there…
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First launch
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Second launch
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Perspectives
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They’re coming fast and furious now!
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Look up
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So magical!
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Love the rocket
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Rocket launch successful!
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Have a great trip!
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The sky’s the limit
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Bye, Tweety Bird!

A Trip to Kingsbrae Garden

Kingsbrae Garden is a flower lovers dream.  Even for non-gardeners, stepping through the gates of Kingsbrae Garden into these lush grounds feels like entering the Garden of Eden, perhaps even heaven.

Sprawled over 27 acres, Kingsbrae Garden is located in the beautiful town of St. Andrews-by-the-Sea.  The gardens contain over 2500 species of perennials as well as numerous types of trees and shrubs. There’s also a nature walk through the Acadian Forest, a sculpture garden, a windmill and animals to entertain the kids.

I had never visited the gardens before but after seeing a stunning shot of the entrance taken by a friend, I knew I had to drop by for a visit.

I was absolutely stunned by the size of the Kingsbrae Garden.  As Donald would say, it’s huuugge.  You really need several hours to fully explore the grounds and see everything. All I kept thinking while I was walking around and marveling at everything was how much work it must be to maintain this perfectly manicured tribute to nature.  There are so many interesting things to examine, and so many flowers bursting with colour.  I’m sure it’s a full time job for a whole staff of green thumbs.

I would say that the flower trees at the entrance and the sculpture garden were two of my favourite areas, but literally everything is worth seeing.  Kudos to those who work so hard to maintain such a wonderful addition to our province, for tourists and locals alike. It’s truly something that everyone can enjoy.

Below are some photos from my visit.

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A stunning entrance
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How beautiful is this?
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Entry Garden
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Looking back at the Visitors’s Centre
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Entering the Perennial Garden
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Perennial Garden
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This place is the bee’s knees!
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Perfectly manicured Knot & Rose Garden
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Alpaca’s hangin’ out
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And goats
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There’s a windmill.  A WINDMILL.
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A nature photographers dream
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Whimsical sculptures abound

 

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Heath & Heather Garden
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Sculpture Garden
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Sculpture Garden
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Big red chair overlooking the Cafe

If you’ve ever wondered if Kingsbrae Garden is worth a visit, or if you haven’t been there lately, please go!  For anyone who likes to take photos or who is a gardener, this place is amazing.  I couldn’t stop taking pictures and every one was as beautiful as the last.

For more information on Kingsbrae Garden, visit their website kingsbraegarden.com.